Posts

Brute Force Attack

This post is part of our Cyber Threat Series.

The Challenge:

Hackers use Brute Force Attacks to target a single service exposed to the Internet, including Remote Desktop, Outlook Web Access, and email services. Brute Force Attacks gain access by trying every viable access method or password.

Hackers use these attacks to access your data or to install other malware within your systems. Patient hackers space out attempts; they are difficult to notice or detect. When hackers rush, the impact can be similar to a DDOS attack.

Hackers can launch Brute Force Attacks externally or from malware-infected systems on your network. Internal attacks often target specific systems and vulnerabilities, such as SQL Server and SQL Injection vulnerabilities.

What to Do:

Require robust passwords; they are your first protection from Brute Force Attacks. Put controls in place to enforce best-practice password structure and expiring passwords can thwart an attack.

Deploy Multi-Factor Authentication. MFA creates and additional level of protection since a compromised password is not sufficient for access.

To protect against internal attacks, ensure systems run current operating system versions. Keep all systems current with patches and updates.

Deploy “Next Gen” protections to keep Brute Force Attack malware from making it onto your servers and clients:

  • Advanced threat protection (ATP) for email
  • Endpoint and mobile device protection
  • DNS security and protection
  • Web protection and filtering

 


Contact us to discuss your cyber threat protections. The Cloud Advisory session is complimentary and without obligation.


 

Distributed Denial of Service Attacks

This post is part of our Cyber Threat Series.

The Challenge:

Cyber criminals can cripple your business without every breaching your security. By using systems and botnets, they blast garbage Internet traffic at your public IP address(es).  The Denial of Service Attack is distributed (hence the name) across many sources, making it more difficult to block.

DDOS attacks stop your Internet traffic. They block communications and access to applications and services. In some cases, DDOS attackers demand ransom payments to halt the attack.

What to Do:

Move your computing to cloud services. Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and other public cloud providers build their networks to prevent DOS attacks.  They have multiple entry points and routes to their services and manage multiple layers of DDOS protections.

Upgrade to “Next Gen” routers with improved DDOS protections. These routers can identify attacks and help reroute your Internet traffic around the attack.

Add an alternate Internet connection.  Having a second connection can allow your network traffic to circumvent the attack or can provide a failover connection when needed.

Maintain strong endpoint protection to prevent botnet malware from being installed on internal systems.

Subscribe to hosted DDOS services that can route traffic around, and prevent, DDOS attacks.

 


Contact us to discuss your cyber threat protections. The Cloud Advisory session is complimentary and without obligation.


 

Hostile Network Probes and Scans

This post is part of our Cyber Threat Series.

The Challenge:

Hostile network probes and scans check your network devices and systems for security holes. Hackers and bots scan specific IP address for open and unsecured ports. While most scans come from the outside, hackers use malware to infect systems and probe networks from the inside. Once they find a security hole, hackers access information, install malware, or gain control systems.  Some probes look for specific vulnerabilities, others use brute force.

What to Do:

Close as many Internet-facing ports as possible across firewalls, routers, and other Internet-facing devices. Close ports on network devices that are not needed for internal communications. If a port isn’t open, it cannot be hacked.  

Avoid consumer-grade and low-end firewalls to protect your physical network.  Low-end devices lack features needed to protect your business. With advanced protection features and tools, “Next Gen” firewalls offer better protection from modern threats. With models designed for SMBs, you fill find these new solutions affordable.

Scan your network for vulnerabilities on a regular schedule. Finding problems before an attack is worth the effort and relatively low cost.

Configure alerts, when able, to notify you of potential risks.  While you and most SMBs cannot afford and do not need a network and security management system, you can configure many devices to send basic alerts by email. These alerts give you an early warning you can evaluate and manage.

Move to cloud solutions and hosting service providers and increase your cyber security profile.  Google, Microsoft, and Amazon depend on the security of their environment to earn and maintain the trust of customers like you. They staff security teams with thousands of experts, follow best practices, and deploy the most advanced threat protection technologies.  Your risk of a network scan or probe attack when using Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft Azure, or Amazon AWS is orders of magnitude less than running systems in-house.

 


Contact us to discuss your cyber threat protections. The Cloud Advisory session is complimentary and without obligation.